UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

 

(Mark One)

xQUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the quarterly period ended March 31, 2019

 

or

 

¨TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from                      to                     

 

Commission File Number: 001-35784

 

 

 

NORWEGIAN CRUISE LINE HOLDINGS LTD.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Bermuda   98-0691007
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)   (I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
     
7665 Corporate Center Drive, Miami, Florida 33126   33126
(Address of principal executive offices)   (zip code)

 

(305) 436-4000

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

N/A

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x     No  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).     Yes  x     No  ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer x Accelerated filer ¨
Non-accelerated filer ¨ Smaller reporting company ¨
Emerging growth company ¨  

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.     ¨

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).     Yes  ¨     No  x

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class   Trading Symbol(s)   Name of each exchange on which registered
Ordinary shares, par value $0.001 per share   NCLH   The New York Stock Exchange

 

There were 215,395,406 ordinary shares outstanding as of April 30, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION  
     
Item 1. Financial Statements 3
     
Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 20
     
Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 31
     
Item 4. Controls and Procedures 31
   
PART II. OTHER INFORMATION  
     
Item 1. Legal Proceedings 32
     
Item 1A. Risk Factors 32
     
Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds 33
     
Item 5. Other Information 34
     
Item 6. Exhibits 34
   
SIGNATURES 35

 

 2 

 

 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.

Consolidated Statements of Operations

(Unaudited)

(in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Revenue          
Passenger ticket  $973,273   $889,866 
Onboard and other   430,357    403,537 
Total revenue   1,403,630    1,293,403 
Cruise operating expense          
Commissions, transportation and other   229,264    218,340 
Onboard and other   79,413    70,688 
Payroll and related   223,107    209,824 
Fuel   98,253    93,431 
Food   55,045    50,656 
Other   141,569    125,152 
Total cruise operating expense   826,651    768,091 
Other operating expense          
Marketing, general and administrative   248,942    227,015 
Depreciation and amortization   169,741    131,244 
Total other operating expense   418,683    358,259 
Operating income   158,296    167,053 
Non-operating income (expense)          
Interest expense, net   (73,503)   (59,698)
Other income (expense), net   (434)   (1,666)
Total non-operating income (expense)   (73,937)   (61,364)
Net income before income taxes   84,359    105,689 
Income tax benefit (expense)   33,798    (2,534)
Net income  $118,157   $103,155 
Weighted-average shares outstanding          
Basic   217,241,473    227,343,577 
Diluted   218,873,272    229,187,628 
Earnings per share          
Basic  $0.54   $0.45 
Diluted  $0.54   $0.45 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 3 

 

 

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income

(Unaudited)

(in thousands)

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Net income  $118,157   $103,155 
Other comprehensive income:          
Shipboard Retirement Plan   95    105 
Cash flow hedges:          
Net unrealized gain   15,152    48,576 
Amount realized and reclassified into earnings   (7,000)   (1,785)
Total other comprehensive income   8,247    46,896 
Total comprehensive income  $126,404   $150,051 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 4 

 

 

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.

Consolidated Balance Sheets

(Unaudited)

(in thousands, except share data)

 

   March 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
Assets          
Current assets:          
Cash and cash equivalents  $304,708   $163,851 
Accounts receivable, net   57,054    55,249 
Inventories   90,101    90,202 
Prepaid expenses and other assets   316,532    241,011 
Total current assets   768,395    550,313 
Property and equipment, net   12,181,007    12,119,253 
Goodwill   1,388,931    1,388,931 
Tradenames   817,525    817,525 
Other long-term assets   605,235    329,948 
Total assets  $15,761,093   $15,205,970 
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity          
Current liabilities:          
Current portion of long-term debt  $608,307   $681,218 
Accounts payable   66,665    159,564 
Accrued expenses and other liabilities   731,221    716,499 
Advance ticket sales   2,023,227    1,593,219 
Total current liabilities   3,429,420    3,150,500 
Long-term debt   5,934,185    5,810,873 
Other long-term liabilities   492,186    281,596 
Total liabilities   9,855,791    9,242,969 
Commitments and contingencies (Note 11)          
Shareholders’ equity:          
Ordinary shares, $.001 par value; 490,000,000 shares authorized; 236,844,434 shares issued and 215,386,265 shares outstanding at March 31, 2019 and 235,484,613 shares issued and 217,650,644 shares outstanding at December 31, 2018   237    235 
Additional paid-in capital   4,145,530    4,129,639 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)   (153,400)   (161,647)
Retained earnings   3,016,997    2,898,840 
Treasury shares (21,458,169 and 17,833,969 ordinary shares at March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively, at cost)   (1,104,062)   (904,066)
Total shareholders’ equity   5,905,302    5,963,001 
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity  $15,761,093   $15,205,970 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 5 

 

 

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(Unaudited)

(in thousands)

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Cash flows from operating activities          
Net income  $118,157   $103,155 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization expense   169,714    134,546 
(Gain) loss on derivatives   4    (10)
Deferred income taxes, net   (32,094)   809 
Loss on extinguishment of debt   2,903     
Provision for bad debts and inventory   1,022    1,266 
Share-based compensation expense   26,999    28,102 
    Net foreign currency adjustments   (1,896)    
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Accounts receivable, net   (2,179)   1,618 
Inventories   (496)   1,363 
Prepaid expenses and other assets   (51,914)   (45,709)
Accounts payable   (89,914)   13,163 
Accrued expenses and other liabilities   (44,281)   (3,180)
Advance ticket sales   439,352    375,638 
Net cash provided by operating activities   535,377    610,761 
Cash flows from investing activities          
Additions to property and equipment, net   (214,559)    (143,874)
Proceeds from promissory note   259    249 
Issuance of promissory note    (7,907)    
Cash received on settlement of derivatives   289     
Net cash used in investing activities   (221,918)   (143,625)
Cash flows from financing activities          
Repayments of long-term debt   (2,345,589)   (252,826)
Proceeds from long-term debt   2,392,000    290,878 
Proceeds from employee related plans   7,744    5,961 
Net share settlement of restricted share units   (18,850)   (12,171)
Purchases of treasury shares   (199,996)   (263,505)
Deferred financing fees   (7,911)   (109,915)
Net cash used in financing activities   (172,602)   (341,578)
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents   140,857    125,558 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period   163,851    176,190 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of period  $304,708   $301,748 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 6 

 

 

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity

(Unaudited)

(in thousands)

 

   Ordinary
Shares
   Additional
Paid-in
Capital
   Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
   Retained
Earnings
   Treasury
Shares
   Total
Shareholders’
Equity
 
                         
Balance, December 31, 2017  $233   $3,998,694   $26,966   $1,963,128   $(239,255)  $5,749,766 
Share-based compensation       28,102                28,102 
Issuance of shares under employee related plans   2    5,959                5,961 
Treasury shares                   (263,505)   (263,505)
Net share settlement of restricted share units       (12,171)               (12,171)
Cumulative change in accounting policy           (12)   (19,131)       (19,143)
Other comprehensive income, net           46,908            46,908 
Net income               103,155        103,155 
Balance, March 31, 2018  $235   $4,020,584   $73,862   $2,047,152   $(502,760)  $5,639,073 
                               
Balance, December 31, 2018  $235   $4,129,639   $(161,647)  $2,898,840   $(904,066)  $5,963,001 
Share-based compensation       26,999                26,999 
Issuance of shares under employee related plans   2    7,742                7,744 
Treasury shares                   (199,996)   (199,996)
Net share settlement of restricted share units       (18,850)               (18,850)
Other comprehensive income, net           8,247            8,247 
Net income               118,157        118,157 
Balance, March 31, 2019  $237   $4,145,530   $(153,400)  $3,016,997   $(1,104,062)  $5,905,302 

  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

 7 

 

 

Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

(Unaudited)

 

Unless otherwise indicated or the context otherwise requires, references in this report to (i) the “Company,” “we,” “our” and “us” refer to NCLH (as defined below) and its subsidiaries (including Prestige (as defined below), except for periods prior to the consummation of the Acquisition of Prestige (as defined below)), (ii) “NCLC” refers to NCL Corporation Ltd., (iii) “NCLH” refers to Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd., (iv)“Norwegian Cruise Line” or “Norwegian” refers to the Norwegian Cruise Line brand and its predecessors, and (v) “Prestige” refers to Prestige Cruises International S. de R.L. (formerly Prestige Cruises International, Inc.), together with its consolidated subsidiaries, including Prestige Cruise Holdings S. de R.L. (formerly Prestige Cruise Holdings, Inc.), Prestige’s direct wholly-owned subsidiary, which in turn is the parent of Oceania Cruises S. de R.L. (formerly Oceania Cruises, Inc.) (“Oceania Cruises”) and Seven Seas Cruises S. de R.L. (“Regent”) (Oceania Cruises also refers to the brand by the same name and Regent also refers to the brand Regent Seven Seas Cruises).

 

References to the “U.S.” are to the United States of America, and “dollar(s)” or “$” are to U.S. dollars, the “U.K.” are to the United Kingdom and “euro(s)” or “€” are to the official currency of the Eurozone. We refer you to “Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations— “Terminology” for the capitalized terms used and not otherwise defined throughout these notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

1.Description of Business and Organization

 

We are a leading global cruise company which operates the Norwegian Cruise Line, Oceania Cruises and Regent Seven Seas Cruises brands. As of March 31, 2019, we had 26 ships with approximately 54,400 Berths and had orders for 11 additional ships to be delivered through 2027, subject to certain conditions.

 

Norwegian Encore is on order for delivery in the fall of 2019. We have two Explorer Class Ships, Seven Seas Splendor and one additional ship, on order for delivery in the winter of 2020 and fall of 2023, respectively. We have two Allura Class Ships on order for delivery in the winter of 2022 and spring of 2025. Project Leonardo will introduce an additional six ships with expected delivery dates from 2022 through 2027. These additions to our fleet will increase our total Berths to approximately 82,000.

 

2.Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements are unaudited and, in our opinion, contain all normal recurring adjustments necessary for a fair statement of the results for the periods presented.

 

Our operations are seasonal and results for interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results for the entire fiscal year. Historically, demand for cruises has been strongest during the Northern Hemisphere’s summer months. The interim consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2018, which are included in our most recent Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC.

 

 8 

 

 

Earnings Per Share

 

A reconciliation between basic and diluted earnings per share was as follows (in thousands, except share and per share data):

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Net income  $118,157   $103,155 
Basic weighted-average shares outstanding   217,241,473    227,343,577 
Dilutive effect of share awards   1,631,799    1,844,051 
Diluted weighted-average shares outstanding   218,873,272    229,187,628 
Basic earnings per share  $0.54   $0.45 
Diluted earnings per share  $0.54   $0.45 

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, a total of 5.5 million and 3.4 million shares, respectively, have been excluded from diluted weighted-average shares outstanding because the effect of including them would have been anti-dilutive.

 

Foreign Currency

 

The majority of our transactions are settled in U.S. dollars. We translate assets and liabilities of our foreign subsidiaries at exchange rates in effect at the balance sheet date. Gains or losses resulting from transactions denominated in other currencies are recognized in our consolidated statements of operations within other income (expense), net and such losses were approximately $1.0 million and $1.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively.

 

Depreciation and Amortization Expense

 

The amortization of deferred financing fees is included in depreciation and amortization expense in the consolidated statements of cash flows; however, for purposes of the consolidated statements of operations they are included in interest expense, net.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Guidance

 

In August 2018, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standard Update (“ASU”) No. 2018-15, Intangibles—Goodwill and Other—Internal-Use Software (Subtopic 350-40): Customer’s Accounting for Implementation Costs Incurred in a Cloud Computing Arrangement That is a Service Contract (a consensus of the FAS Emerging Issues Task Force), which is designed to align the accounting for costs of implementing a cloud computing service arrangement, regardless of whether the hosting arrangement conveys a license to the hosted software. For hosting arrangements considered to be a service contract, the update requires that the criteria for capitalization of developing or obtaining internal-use software shall be applied. The update is effective for annual periods, including interim periods within those annual periods, beginning after December 15, 2020, with early adoption permitted, including adoption in any interim period. A prospective or retrospective transition approach must be elected. The Company is evaluating the impact of this guidance on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, Intangibles—Goodwill and Other (Topic 350) — Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment, which simplifies the test for goodwill impairment by eliminating Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test. Step 2 measures a goodwill impairment loss by comparing the implied fair value of a reporting unit’s goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill. The guidance is effective for annual or any interim goodwill impairment tests in years beginning after December 15, 2019, with early adoption permitted for interim or annual goodwill impairment tests performed on testing dates after January 1, 2017. The Company does not expect to early adopt this guidance. The Company will evaluate, upon adoption of this guidance, the impact of this guidance on the Company’s consolidated financial statements. 

 

 9 

 

 

3.Revenue Recognition

 

Disaggregation of Revenue

 

Revenue and cash flows are affected by economic factors in various geographical regions. Revenues by destination were as follows (in thousands): 

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2018 
North America  $982,989   $875,179 
Europe   33,752    31,070 
Asia-Pacific   222,767    267,718 
South America   90,303    69,274 
Other   73,819    50,162 
Total Revenue  $1,403,630   $1,293,403 

 

Segment Reporting

 

We have concluded that our business has a single reportable segment. Each brand, Norwegian, Oceania Cruises and Regent, constitutes a business for which discrete financial information is available and management regularly reviews the brand level operating results and, therefore, each brand is considered an operating segment. Our operating segments have similar economic and qualitative characteristics, including similar long-term margins and similar products and services; therefore, we aggregate all of the operating segments into one reportable segment.

 

Although we sell cruises on an international basis, our passenger ticket revenue is primarily attributed to U.S.-sourced guests who make reservations in the U.S. Revenue attributable to U.S.-sourced guests has historically approximated 75-80%. No other individual country’s revenues exceed 10% in any given period.

 

Contract Balances 

 

Receivables from customers are included within accounts receivables, net. As of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, our receivables from customers were $17.3 million.

 

Our contract liabilities are included within advance ticket sales. As of March 31, 2019, and December 31, 2018, our contract liabilities were $1.5 billion and $1.2 billion, respectively. Of the amounts included within contract liabilities, approximately 60% were refundable in accordance with our cancellation policies. For the three months ended March 31, 2019, $1.0 billion of revenue recognized was included in the contract liability balance at the beginning of the period.

 

 10 

 

 

4.Intangible Assets

 

The carrying amounts of intangible assets subject to amortization are included within other long-term assets. The gross carrying amounts of intangible assets, the related accumulated amortization, the net carrying amounts and the weighted-average amortization periods of the Company’s intangible assets are listed in the following tables (in thousands, except amortization period):

 

   March 31, 2019 
   Gross Carrying
Amount
   Accumulated
Amortization
   Net Carrying
Amount
   Weighted-
Average
Amortization
Period (Years)
 
Customer relationships  $120,000   $(96,359)  $23,641    6.0 
License   750    (275)   475    10.0 
Total intangible assets subject to amortization  $120,750   $(96,634)  $24,116     

 

   December 31, 2018 
   Gross Carrying
Amount
   Accumulated
Amortization
   Net Carrying
Amount
   Weighted-
Average
Amortization
Period (Years)
 
Customer relationships  $120,000   $(91,756)  $28,244    6.0 
Licenses   3,368    (2,874)   494    5.6 
Total intangible assets subject to amortization  $123,368   $(94,630)  $28,738      

 

The aggregate amortization expense is as follows (in thousands):

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Amortization expense  $4,622   $6,504 

 

The following table sets forth the Company’s estimated aggregate amortization expense for each of the five years below (in thousands):

 

Year ended December 31,  Amortization
Expense
 
2020  $9,906 
2021   75 
2022   75 
2023   75 
2024   75 

 

5.Leases

 

On January 1, 2019, we adopted the ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (“Topic 842”). Topic 842 supersedes the lease accounting requirements in Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 840—Leases. In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-11, Targeted Improvements to Topic 842, which included an option to apply the new leases standard at the adoption date using a modified retrospective approach, which the Company elected.

 

Nature of Leases

 

We have finance leases for certain ship equipment and a corporate office. We have operating leases for port facilities, corporate offices, warehouses, and certain equipment. Many of our leases include both lease and non-lease components. We have adopted the practical expedient which allows us to combine lease and non-lease components by class of asset. We have applied this expedient for office leases, port facilities, and certain equipment.

 

 11 

 

 

Significant Assumptions and Judgements in Applying Topic 842 and Practical Expedients Elected

 

Our leases contain both fixed and variable payments. Fixed payments and variable lease payments that depend on a rate or index are included in the calculation of the right-of-use asset. Other variable payments are excluded from the calculation unless there is an unavoidable fixed minimum cost related to those payments such as a minimum annual guarantee. Our lease assets are amortized on a straight-line basis except for our rights to use port facilities. The expenses related to port facilities are amortized based on passenger counts as this basis represents the pattern in which the economic benefit is derived from the right to use the underlying asset.

 

For non-consecutive lease terms, which relate to our rights to use certain port facilities, the term of the lease is based on the number of days on which we have the right to use a specified asset. We have adopted the practical expedient to exclude leases with terms of less than one year from being included on the balance sheet. Lease expense for agreements that are short-term are disclosed below and include both fixed and variable payments.

 

Certain leases include one or more options to extend or terminate and are primarily in five-year increments. Lease extensions and terminations, including auto-renewing lease terms, were only included in the calculation of the right-of-use asset to the extent that the right to renew or terminate was at the option of the lessor only or where there was a more than insignificant penalty for termination.

 

As our leases do not have a readily determinable implicit rate, we used our weighted average cost of debt to determine the net present value of the lease payments at the adoption date. Our weighted average cost of debt is similar to the incremental borrowing rate we would have obtained if we had borrowed collateralized debt over the lease term to purchase the asset and was adjusted for longer term leases.

 

We have also adopted the practical expedient which allows us, by class of asset, to not separate lease and non-lease components when we are the lessor in the underlying transaction, the transactions would otherwise be accounted for under ASC 606–Revenue Recognition and the non-lease components are the predominant components of the agreements. We have applied this practical expedient to transactions with cruise passengers and concession service providers related to the use of our ships. We refer you to Note 3 – “Revenue Recognition.”

 

Impacts on Financial Statements

 

As a result of the adoption of Topic 842 on January 1, 2019, we recorded operating lease right-of-use assets of $235.0 million and operating lease liabilities of $243.8 million. Another $8.8 million was reclassified to the operating right-of-use assets from other asset and liability accounts relating to the existing leases. The adoption of Topic 842 did not result in the identification of new finance leases. The adoption does not significantly change the timing, classification or amount of expense recognized in our consolidated financial statements nor does it change the timing, classification or amount of cash payments included within the consolidated statement of cash flows.

 

The components of lease expense and revenue were as follows (in thousands):

 

  

Three Months Ended

March 31, 2019

 
Operating lease expense  $8,359 
Variable lease expense  $2,705 
Short-term lease expense  $10,076 
Finance lease cost:     
Amortization of right-to-use assets  $244 
Interest on lease liabilities  $342 
Operating lease revenue  $165 
Sublease income  $404 

 

Lease balances were as follows (in thousands):

 

   Balance Sheet location  March 31, 2019 
Operating leases        
Right-of-use assets  Other long-term assets  $229,174 
Current operating lease liabilities  Accrued expenses and other liabilities  $21,975 
Non-current operating lease liabilities  Other long-term liabilities  $215,983 
         
Finance leases        
Right-of-use assets  Property and equipment, net  $14,544 
Current finance lease liabilities  Current portion of long-term debt  $5,349 
Non-current finance lease liabilities  Long-term debt  $11,440 

 

 12 

 

 

Supplemental cash flow information related to leases was as follows (in thousands):

 

  

Three Months Ended

March 31, 2019

 
Cash paid for amounts included in the measurement of lease liabilities:     
Operating cash outflows from operating leases  $8,305 
Operating cash outflows from finance leases  $275 
Financing cash outflows from finance leases  $503 
      
Right-of-use assets obtained in exchange for lease obligations:     
Operating leases  $770 

 

As of March 31, 2019, maturities of lease liabilities, weighted-average remaining lease terms and discount rates for our leases were as follows (in thousands, except lease terms and discount rates):

 

   Operating
leases
   Finance
leases
 
Remainder of 2019  $23,186   $3,903 
2020   31,903    4,769 
2021   31,606    4,821 
2022   31,462    3,896 
2023   30,874    730 
Thereafter   138,930    1,306 
Total   287,961    19,425 
Less: Present value discount   (50,003)   (2,636)
Present value of lease liabilities  $237,958   $16,789 
Weighted average remaining lease term (years)   8.90    4.56 
Weighted average discount rate   4.26%   7.67%

  

As previously disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K and under the previous lease accounting standard, future minimum lease payments for operating leases having initial or remaining noncancelable lease terms in excess of one year were as follows under ASC 840 (in thousands):

 

Year  December 31, 2018 
2019  $16,651 
2020   16,105 
2021   15,315 
2022   14,391 
2023   13,462 
Thereafter   52,626 
Total minimum annual rentals  $128,550 

 

Leases That Have Not Yet Commenced

 

We have multiple agreements that have been executed where the lease term has not commenced as of March 31, 2019. These are primarily related to our rights to use certain port facilities currently under construction. Although we may have provided design input, construction management services, or funding related to these assets, we have determined that we do not control these assets during the period of construction. These port facilities are expected to open for use during 2020 and include undiscounted minimum annual guarantees of approximately $806.7 million of passenger fees.

 

 13 

 

 

6.Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was as follows (in thousands):

 

   Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
   Change
Related to
Cash Flow
Hedges
   Change
Related to
Shipboard
Retirement
Plan
 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) at beginning of period  $(161,647)  $(157,449)  $(4,198)
Current period other comprehensive income before reclassifications   15,152    15,152     
Amounts reclassified into earnings   (6,905)   (7,000)(1)   95(2)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) at end of period  $(153,400)  $(149,297)(3)  $(4,103)

 

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) for the three months ended March 31, 2018 was as follows (in thousands):

 

   Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
   Change
Related to
Cash Flow
Hedges
   Change
Related to
Shipboard
Retirement
Plan
 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) at beginning of period  $26,966   $33,861   $(6,895)
Current period other comprehensive income before reclassifications   48,576    48,576     
Amounts reclassified into earnings   (1,680)   (1,785)(1)   105(2)
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) at end of period  $73,862   $80,652   $(6,790)

 

 

(1)We refer you to Note 9— “Fair Value Measurements and Derivatives” for the affected line items in the consolidated statements of operations.

(2)Amortization of prior-service cost and actuarial loss reclassified to other income (expense).

(3)Includes $16.7 million of gain expected to be reclassified into earnings in the next 12 months.

 

7.Property and Equipment, net

 

Property and equipment, net increased $61.8 million for the three months ended March 31, 2019 primarily due to ships under construction and ship improvement projects.

 

8.Long-Term Debt

 

NCLC entered into a Fourth Amended and Restated Credit Agreement, dated as of January 2, 2019, with a subsidiary of NCLC, as co-borrower and JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as administrative agent, and certain other lenders. This revised facility, among other things, (a) reduced the pricing of our existing $875 million Revolving Loan Facility, (b) reduced the pricing and increased the approximately $1.3 billion principal amount outstanding under the term loan A facility to $1.6 billion, and (c) extended the maturity dates for our Revolving Loan Facility and our term loan A facility to 2024, subject to certain conditions. We used the proceeds from the increase in our term loan A facility to prepay all of the then outstanding amounts under our term loan B facility. The transaction resulted in a loss on extinguishment of debt of $2.9 million.

 

The applicable margin under the new term loan A facility and new Revolving Loan Facility is determined by reference to a total leverage ratio, with an applicable margin of between 1.75% and 1.00% with respect to Eurocurrency loans and between 0.75% and 0.00% with respect to base rate loans. The current margin for borrowings under the new term loan A facility and new Revolving Loan Facility is 1.50% with respect to Eurocurrency borrowings. In addition to paying interest on outstanding principal under the borrowings, we are obligated to pay a quarterly commitment fee at a rate determined by reference to a total net leverage ratio, with a maximum commitment fee of 0.30%.

 

 14 

 

 

NCLC entered into a $230 million credit agreement, dated as of January 10, 2019, with Nordea Bank ABP, New York Branch, as administrative agent, and certain other lenders. The proceeds of this term loan will be used for general corporate purposes, including to finance the pre-delivery installments due to the builder under the Company’s shipbuilding contracts. The interest rate is LIBOR plus a margin of 1.00%. The term loan matures on January 10, 2021; however, NCLC may elect to extend the maturity date to January 10, 2022 provided certain conditions are met. Should NCLC elect to extend the maturity date the interest rate will be LIBOR plus a margin of 1.10% for the third year.

 

9.Fair Value Measurements and Derivatives

 

Fair value is defined as the price at which an orderly transaction to sell an asset or to transfer a liability would take place between market participants at the measurement date under current market conditions (that is, an exit price at the measurement date from the perspective of a market participant that holds the asset or owes the liability).

 

Fair Value Hierarchy

 

The following hierarchy for inputs used in measuring fair value should maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs by requiring that the most observable inputs be used when available:

 

Level 1   Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that are accessible at the measurement dates.
   
Level 2 Significant other observable inputs that are used by market participants in pricing the asset or liability based on market data obtained from independent sources.
   
Level 3 Significant unobservable inputs we believe market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability based on the best information available.

 

Derivatives

 

We are exposed to market risk attributable to changes in interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates and fuel prices. We attempt to minimize these risks through a combination of our normal operating and financing activities and through the use of derivatives. We assess whether derivatives used in hedging transactions are “highly effective” in offsetting changes in the cash flow of our hedged forecasted transactions. We use regression analysis for this hedge relationship and high effectiveness is achieved when a statistically valid relationship reflects a high degree of offset and correlation between the fair values of the derivative and the hedged forecasted transaction. Cash flows from the derivatives are classified in the same category as the cash flows from the underlying hedged transaction. If it is determined that the hedged forecasted transaction is no longer probable of occurring, then the amount recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) is released to earnings. There are no amounts excluded from the assessment of hedge effectiveness and there are no credit-risk-related contingent features in our derivative agreements. We monitor concentrations of credit risk associated with financial and other institutions with which we conduct significant business. Credit risk, including but not limited to counterparty non-performance under derivatives, is not considered significant, as we primarily conduct business with large, well-established financial institutions with which we have established relationships, and which have credit risks acceptable to us, or the credit risk is spread out among many creditors. We do not anticipate non-performance by any of our significant counterparties.  

 

As of March 31, 2019, we had fuel swaps and collars, which are used to mitigate the financial impact of volatility of fuel prices pertaining to approximately 1.2 million metric tons of our projected fuel purchases, maturing through December 31, 2021.

 

As of March 31, 2019, we had fuel swaps which were not designated as cash flow hedges. Due to a change in our choice of hedged fuel type, we entered into fuel contracts to sell approximately 29 thousand metric tons of fuel and immediately dedesignated fuel contracts to buy approximately 29 thousand metric tons of the same fuel. The agreements mature through December 31, 2019.

 

As of March 31, 2019, we had foreign currency forward contracts, matured foreign currency options and matured foreign currency collars which are used to mitigate the financial impact of volatility in foreign currency exchange rates related to our ship construction contracts denominated in euros. The notional amount of our foreign currency forward contracts was €2.4 billion, or $2.7 billion based on the euro/U.S. dollar exchange rate as of March 31, 2019.

 

As of March 31, 2019, we had interest rate swap agreements which are used to hedge our exposure to interest rate movements and manage our interest expense. The notional amount of our outstanding debt associated with the interest rate swap agreements was $1.2 billion as of March 31, 2019.

 

 15 

 

 

The derivatives measured at fair value and the respective location in the consolidated balance sheets include the following (in thousands):

 

      Assets   Liabilities 
   Balance Sheet Location  March 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
   March 31,
2019
   December 31,
2018
 
Derivative Contracts Designated as Hedging Instruments                       
                        
Fuel contracts                       
   Prepaid expenses and other assets  $22,652   $2,583   $3,579   $1 
   Other long-term assets   12,880    197    1,996    29 
   Accrued expenses and other liabilities   547    1,173    2,943    19,547 
   Other long-term liabilities   1,015    933    10,685    51,184 
Foreign currency contracts                       
   Prepaid expenses and other assets   1,060    5,285        1,497 
   Other long-term assets       3,514         
   Accrued expenses and other liabilities   376    112    40,234    5,145 
   Other long-term liabilities       2,874    77,107    40,476 
Interest rate contracts                       
   Prepaid expenses and other assets   459    519         
   Other long-term assets       27         
   Accrued expenses and other liabilities           624     
   Other long-term liabilities           553     
Total derivatives designated as hedging instruments     $38,989   $17,217   $137,721   $117,879 
                        
Derivative Contracts Not Designated as Hedging Instruments                       
                        
Fuel contracts  Prepaid expenses and other assets  $3,700   $   $241   $ 
                        
Total derivatives not designated as hedging instruments     $3,700   $   $241   $ 
Total derivatives     $42,689   $17,217   $137,962   $117,879 

 

The fair values of swap and forward contracts are determined based on inputs that are readily available in public markets or can be derived from information available in publicly quoted markets. The Company determines the value of options and collars utilizing an option pricing model based on inputs that are either readily available in public markets or can be derived from information available in publicly quoted markets. The option pricing model used by the Company is an industry standard model for valuing options and is used by the broker/dealer community. The inputs to this option pricing model are the option strike price, underlying price, risk-free rate of interest, time to expiration, and volatility. The fair value of option contracts considers both the intrinsic value and any remaining time value associated with those derivatives that have not yet settled. The Company also considers counterparty credit risk and its own credit risk in its determination of all estimated fair values.

 

Our derivatives and financial instruments were categorized as Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy, and we had no derivatives or financial instruments categorized as Level 1 or Level 3. Our derivative contracts include rights of offset with our counterparties. We have elected to net certain assets and liabilities within counterparties when the rights of offset exist. We are not required to post cash collateral related to our derivative instruments.

 

The following table discloses the gross and net amounts recognized within assets and liabilities (in thousands):

 

March 31, 2019 

Gross 

Amounts

   Gross
Amounts
Offset
   Total Net
Amounts
  

Gross
Amounts 

Not Offset

   Net Amounts 
Assets  $40,751   $(5,816)  $34,935   $(1,519)  $33,416 
Liabilities   132,146    (1,938)   130,208    (114,046)   16,162 

 

 16 

 

 

December 31, 2018  Gross Amounts   Gross
Amounts
Offset
   Total Net
Amounts
   Gross
Amounts Not
Offset
   Net Amounts 
Assets  $12,125   $(1,527)  $10,598   $(6,872)  $3,726 
Liabilities   116,352    (5,092)   111,260    (35,718)   75,542 

 

The effects of cash flow hedge accounting on accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) were as follows (in thousands):

 

Derivatives 

Amount of Gain (Loss)

Recognized in Other

Comprehensive Income

  

Location of Gain

(Loss) Reclassified

from Accumulated

Other Comprehensive

Income (Loss) into

Income

 

Amount of Gain (Loss) Reclassified
from Accumulated Other
Comprehensive

Income (Loss) into Income

 
  

Three Months
Ended

March 31, 2019

  

Three Months
Ended

March 31, 2018

     

Three Months
Ended

March 31, 2019

  

Three Months

Ended
March 31, 2018

 
Fuel contracts  $96,508   $(6,012)  Fuel  $7,518   $3,525 
Foreign currency contracts   (80,278)   54,493   Depreciation and amortization   (703)   (1,159)
Interest rate contracts   (1,078)   95   Interest expense, net   185    (581)
Total gain (loss) recognized in other comprehensive income  $15,152   $48,576      $7,000   $1,785 

 

The effects of cash flow hedge accounting on the consolidated statements of operations include the following (in thousands): 

 

   Three Months Ended March 31, 2019   Three Months Ended March 31, 2018 
   Fuel   Depreciation
and
Amortization
   Interest
Expense, net
   Fuel   Depreciation
and
Amortization
   Interest
Expense, net
 
Total amounts of income and expense line items presented in the consolidated statements of operations in which the effects of cash flow hedges are recorded  $98,253   $169,741   $73,503   $93,431   $131,244   $59,698 
                               
Amount of gain (loss) reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) into income                              
Fuel contracts   7,518            3,525         
Foreign currency contracts       (703)           (1,159)    
Interest rate contracts           185            (581)

 

Long-Term Debt

 

As of March 31, 2019, and December 31, 2018, the fair value of our long-term debt, including the current portion, was $6,686.1 million and $6,601.9 million, respectively, which was $30.3 million higher and $8.4 million lower, respectively, than the carrying values. The difference between the fair value and carrying value of our long-term debt is due to our fixed and variable rate debt obligations carrying interest rates that are above or below market rates at the measurement dates. The fair value of our long-term debt was calculated based on estimated rates for the same or similar instruments with similar terms and remaining maturities, considered to be Level 2 inputs in the fair value hierarchy. Market risk associated with our long-term variable rate debt is the potential increase in interest expense from an increase in interest rates.

 

Other

 

The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets of all other financial assets and liabilities approximate fair value.

 

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10.Employee Benefits and Compensation Plans

 

Share Option Awards

 

The following is a summary of option activity under NCLH’s Amended and Restated 2013 Performance Incentive Plan for the three months ended March 31, 2019: 

 

   Number of Share Option
Awards
   Weighted-Average Exercise
Price
   Weighted-    
   Time-
Based
Awards
   Performance-
Based
Awards
   Market-
Based
Awards
   Time-
Based
Awards
   Performance-
Based
Awards
   Market-
Based
Awards
   Average
Contractual Term
(years)
   Aggregate
Intrinsic Value
(in thousands)
 
Outstanding as of January 1, 2019   5,686,793    410,499    208,333   $50.65   $45.67   $59.43   6.22   $13,946 
Exercised   (129,150)   (54,695)       38.40    19.00               
Forfeited and cancelled   (27,000)   (156,251)       57.03    59.43               
Outstanding as of March 31, 2019   5,530,643    199,553    208,333   $50.90   $42.21   $59.43   6.02   $33,072 

 

Restricted Ordinary Share Awards

 

The following is a summary of restricted NCLH ordinary share activity for the three months ended March 31, 2019:

 

   Number of
Time-Based
Awards
   Weighted-
Average Grant
Date Fair
Value
 
Non-vested as of January 1, 2019   429   $58.41 
Vested   (429)   58.41 
Non-vested and expected to vest as of March 31, 2019   -   $- 

 

Restricted Share Unit Awards

 

On March 1, 2019, NCLH granted 1.9 million time-based restricted share unit awards to our employees which vest in substantially equal annual installments over three years. Additionally, on March 1, 2019, NCLH granted 0.5 million performance-based restricted share units to certain members of our management team, which vest upon the achievement of certain pre-established performance targets established for the 2019 and 2020 calendar years and the satisfaction of an additional time-based vesting requirement that generally requires continued employment through March 1, 2022.

 

The following is a summary of restricted share unit activity for the three months ended March 31, 2019:

 

   Number of
Time-Based
Awards
   Weighted-
Average Grant
Date Fair
Value
   Number of
Performance-
Based
Awards
   Weighted-
Average Grant
Date Fair Value
   Number of
Market-
Based
Awards
   Weighted-
Average Grant
Date Fair Value
 
Non-vested as of January 1, 2019   2,973,032   $53.98    825,614   $56.58    50,000   $59.43 
Granted   1,902,847    55.03    462,282(1)   55.27         
Vested   (1,358,074)   53.13    (121,000)   56.27         
Forfeited or expired   (35,536)   54.74    (37,500)   56.27         
Non-vested and expected to vest as of March 31, 2019   3,482,269   $54.88    1,129,396   $56.09    50,000   $59.43 

 

 

(1)Number of performance-based restricted share units included assumes maximum achievement of performance targets.

 

The share-based compensation expense for the three months ended March 31, 2019 was $27.0 million of which $23.2 million was recorded in marketing, general and administrative expense and $3.8 million was recorded in payroll and related expense. The share-based compensation expense for the three months ended March 31, 2018 was $28.1 million of which $24.7 million was recorded in marketing, general and administrative expense and $3.4 million was recorded in payroll and related expense.

 

11.Commitments and Contingencies

 

Ship Construction Contracts

 

Project Leonardo will introduce an additional six ships, each approximately 140,000 Gross Tons with approximately 3,300 Berths, with expected delivery dates from 2022 through 2027, subject to certain conditions. We have a Breakaway Plus Class Ship, Norwegian Encore, with approximately 168,000 Gross Tons and 4,000 Berths, on order for delivery in the fall of 2019. For the Regent brand, we have orders for two Explorer Class Ships, Seven Seas Splendor and an additional ship, to be delivered in 2020 and 2023, respectively. Each of the Explorer Class Ships will be approximately 55,000 Gross Tons and 750 Berths. For the Oceania Cruises brand, we have orders for two Allura Class Ships to be delivered in 2022 and 2025. Each of the Allura Class Ships will be approximately 67,000 Gross Tons and 1,200 Berths.

 

 18 

 

 

The combined contract prices of the 11 ships on order for delivery was approximately €7.9 billion, or $8.9 billion based on the euro/U.S. dollar exchange rate as of March 31, 2019. We have obtained export credit financing which is expected to fund approximately 80% of the contract price of each ship, subject to certain conditions. We do not anticipate any contractual breaches or cancellations to occur. However, if any such events were to occur, it could result in, among other things, the forfeiture of prior deposits or payments made by us and potential claims and impairment losses which may materially impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Litigation

 

In the normal course of our business, various claims and lawsuits have been filed or are pending against us. Most of these claims and lawsuits are covered by insurance and, accordingly, the maximum amount of our liability is typically limited to our deductible amount.

 

Nonetheless, the ultimate outcome of these claims and lawsuits that are not covered by insurance cannot be determined at this time. We have evaluated our overall exposure with respect to all of our threatened and pending litigation and, to the extent required, we have accrued amounts for all estimable probable losses associated with our deemed exposure. We are currently unable to estimate any other potential contingent losses beyond those accrued, as discovery is not complete nor is adequate information available to estimate such range of loss or potential recovery. However, based on our current knowledge, we do not believe that the aggregate amount or range of reasonably possible losses with respect to these matters will be material to our consolidated results of operations, financial condition or cash flows. We intend to vigorously defend our legal position on all claims and, to the extent necessary, seek recovery. 

 

12.Other Income (Expense), Net

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2019, other income (expense), net was a $0.4 million expense, primarily due to foreign currency exchange losses. For the three months ended March 31, 2018, the $1.7 million expense was due to foreign currency exchange losses.

 

13.Income Tax Expense

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2019, we had an income tax benefit of $33.8 million. During 2018, we implemented certain tax restructuring strategies that created our ability to utilize the net operating loss carryforwards of Prestige, for which we had previously provided a full valuation allowance. As disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, we engaged in a section 382 study to determine the amount of the Prestige net operating loss carryforwards that could be utilized against future taxable income. In March of 2019, we completed this study resulting in a tax benefit of $35.7 million in connection with the reversal of substantially all of the valuation allowance.

 

14.Supplemental Cash Flow Information

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, we had non-cash investing activities in connection with property and equipment of $9.8 million and $25.7 million, respectively.

 

 19 

 

 

Item 2. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements

 

Certain statements in this report constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the U.S. federal securities laws intended to qualify for the safe harbor from liability established by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All statements other than statements of historical facts contained, or incorporated by reference, in this report, including, without limitation, those regarding our business strategy, financial position, results of operations, plans, prospects and objectives of management for future operations (including expected fleet additions, development plans, objectives relating to our activities and expected performance in new markets), are forward-looking statements. Many, but not all, of these statements can be found by looking for words like “expect,” “anticipate,” “goal,” “project,” “plan,” “believe,” “seek,” “will,” “may,” “forecast,” “estimate,” “intend,” “future” and similar words. Forward-looking statements do not guarantee future performance and may involve risks, uncertainties and other factors which could cause our actual results, performance or achievements to differ materially from the future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied in those forward-looking statements. Examples of these risks, uncertainties and other factors include, but are not limited to the impact of:

 

·adverse events impacting the security of travel, such as terrorist acts, armed conflict and threats thereof, acts of piracy, and other international events;

 

·adverse incidents involving cruise ships;

 

·adverse general economic and related factors, such as fluctuating or increasing levels of unemployment, underemployment and the volatility of fuel prices, declines in the securities and real estate markets, and perceptions of these conditions that decrease the level of disposable income of consumers or consumer confidence;

 

·the spread of epidemics and viral outbreaks;

 

·breaches in data security or other disturbances to our information technology and other networks;

 

·the risks and increased costs associated with operating internationally;

 

·changes in fuel prices and/or other cruise operating costs;

 

·fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates;

 

·our expansion into and investments in new markets;

 

·overcapacity in key markets or globally;

 

·the unavailability of attractive port destinations;

 

·our inability to obtain adequate insurance coverage;

 

·evolving requirements and regulations regarding data privacy and protection and any actual or perceived compliance failures by us;

 

·our indebtedness and restrictions in the agreements governing our indebtedness that limit our flexibility in operating our business, including the significant portion of assets that are collateral under these agreements;

 

·volatility and disruptions in the global credit and financial markets, which may adversely affect our ability to borrow and could increase our counterparty credit risks, including those under our credit facilities, derivatives, contingent obligations, insurance contracts and new ship progress payment guarantees;

 

·our inability to recruit or retain qualified personnel or the loss of key personnel;

 

·delays in our shipbuilding program and ship repairs, maintenance and refurbishments;

 

·our reliance on third parties to provide hotel management services to certain ships and certain other services;

 

 20 

 

 

·future increases in the price of, or major changes or reduction in, commercial airline services;

 

·amendments to our collective bargaining agreements for crew members and other employee relation issues;

 

·pending or threatened litigation, investigations and enforcement actions;

 

·our ability to keep pace with developments in technology;

 

·seasonal variations in passenger fare rates and occupancy levels at different times of the year;

 

·changes involving the tax and environmental regulatory regimes in which we operate; and

 

·other factors set forth under “Risk Factors” herein and in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018, filed with the SEC on February 27, 2019 (“Annual Report on Form 10-K”).

 

The above examples are not exhaustive and new risks emerge from time to time. Such forward-looking statements are based on our current beliefs, assumptions, expectations, estimates and projections regarding our present and future business strategies and the environment in which we expect to operate in the future. These forward-looking statements speak only as of the date made. We expressly disclaim any obligation or undertaking to release publicly any updates or revisions to any forward-looking statement to reflect any change in our expectations with regard thereto or any change of events, conditions or circumstances on which any such statement was based, except as required by law.

 

Terminology

 

This report includes certain non-GAAP financial measures, such as Net Revenue, Net Yield, Net Cruise Cost, Adjusted Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EPS. Definitions of these non- GAAP financial measures are included below. For further information about our non-GAAP financial measures including detailed adjustments made in calculation our non-GAAP financial measures and a reconciliation to the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure, we refer you to “Results of Operations’ below.

 

Unless otherwise indicated in this report, the following terms have the meanings set forth below:

 

·Acquisition of Prestige. In November 2014, we acquired Prestige in a cash and stock transaction for total consideration of $3.025 billion, including the assumption of debt.

 

·Adjusted EBITDA. EBITDA adjusted for other income (expense), net and other supplemental adjustments.

 

·Adjusted EPS. Adjusted Net Income divided by the number of diluted weighted-average shares outstanding.

 

·Adjusted Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel. Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel adjusted for supplemental adjustments.

 

·Adjusted Net Income. Net income adjusted for supplemental adjustments.

 

·Adjusted Net Revenue. Net Revenue adjusted for supplemental adjustments.

 

·Adjusted Net Yield. Net Yield adjusted for supplemental adjustments.

 

·Allura Class Ships.  Oceania Cruises’ two ships on order.

 

·Berths. Double occupancy capacity per cabin (single occupancy per studio cabin) even though many cabins can accommodate three or more passengers.

 

·Breakaway Plus Class Ships.  Norwegian Escape, Norwegian Joy, Norwegian Bliss and Norwegian Encore.

 

·Business Enhancement Capital Expenditures. Capital expenditures other than those related to new ship construction and ROI Capital Expenditures.

 

 21 

 

  

·Capacity Days. Available Berths multiplied by the number of cruise days for the period.

 

·Constant Currency. A calculation whereby foreign currency-denominated revenue and expenses in a period are converted at the U.S. dollar exchange rate of a comparable period to eliminate the effects of foreign exchange fluctuations.

 

·Dry-dock. A process whereby a ship is positioned in a large basin where all of the fresh/sea water is pumped out in order to carry out cleaning and repairs of those parts of a ship which are below the water line.

 

·EBITDA. Earnings before interest, taxes, and depreciation and amortization.

 

·EPS. Earnings per share.

 

·Explorer Class Ships. Regent’s Seven Seas Explorer, Seven Seas Splendor, and an additional ship on order.

 

·GAAP. Generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S.

 

·Gross Cruise Cost. The sum of total cruise operating expense and marketing, general and administrative expense.

 

·Gross Tons. A unit of enclosed passenger space on a cruise ship, such that one gross ton equals 100 cubic feet or 2.831 cubic meters.

 

·Gross Yield. Total revenue per Capacity Day.

 

·Net Cruise Cost. Gross Cruise Cost less commissions, transportation and other expense and onboard and other expense.

 

·Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel. Net Cruise Cost less fuel expense.

 

·Net Revenue. Total revenue less commissions, transportation and other expense and onboard and other expense.

 

·Net Yield. Net Revenue per Capacity Day.

 

·Occupancy Percentage. The ratio of Passenger Cruise Days to Capacity Days. A percentage greater than 100% indicates that three or more passengers occupied some cabins.

 

·Passenger Cruise Days. The number of passengers carried for the period, multiplied by the number of days in their respective cruises.

 

·Project Leonardo. The next generation of ships for our Norwegian brand.

 

·Revolving Loan Facility. $875.0 million senior secured revolving credit facility.

 

·ROI Capital Expenditures. Comprised of project-based capital expenditures which have a quantified return on investment.

 

·SEC. U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

·Secondary Equity Offering(s). Secondary public offering(s) of NCLH’s ordinary shares in December 2018, March 2018, November 2017, August 2017, December 2015, August 2015, May 2015, March 2015, March 2014, December 2013 and August 2013.

 

·Shipboard Retirement Plan. An unfunded defined benefit pension plan for certain crew members which computes benefits based on years of service, subject to certain requirements.

  

Non-GAAP Financial Measures

 

We use certain non-GAAP financial measures, such as Net Revenue, Net Yield, Net Cruise Cost, Adjusted Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel, Adjusted EBITDA, Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EPS, to enable us to analyze our performance. See “Terminology” for the definitions of these and other non-GAAP financial measures. We utilize Net Revenue and Net Yield to manage our business on a day-to-day basis and believe that they are the most relevant measures of our revenue performance because they reflect the revenue earned by us net of significant variable costs. In measuring our ability to control costs in a manner that positively impacts net income, we believe changes in Net Cruise Cost and Adjusted Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel to be the most relevant indicators of our performance.

 

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As our business includes the sourcing of passengers and deployment of vessels outside of the U.S., a portion of our revenue and expenses are denominated in foreign currencies, particularly British pound, Canadian dollar, Euro and Australian dollar which are subject to fluctuations in currency exchange rates versus our reporting currency, the U.S. dollar. In order to monitor results excluding these fluctuations, we calculate certain non-GAAP measures on a Constant Currency basis, whereby current period revenue and expenses denominated in foreign currencies are converted to U.S. dollars using currency exchange rates of the comparable period. We believe that presenting these non-GAAP measures on both a reported and Constant Currency basis is useful in providing a more comprehensive view of trends in our business.

 

We believe that Adjusted EBITDA is appropriate as a supplemental financial measure as it is used by management to assess operating performance. We also believe that Adjusted EBITDA is a useful measure in determining our performance as it reflects certain operating drivers of our business, such as sales growth, operating costs, marketing, general and administrative expense and other operating income and expense. Adjusted EBITDA is not a defined term under GAAP nor is it intended to be a measure of liquidity or cash flows from operations or a measure comparable to net income, as it does not take into account certain requirements such as capital expenditures and related depreciation, principal and interest payments and tax payments and it includes other supplemental adjustments.

 

In addition, Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EPS are non-GAAP financial measures that exclude certain amounts and are used to supplement GAAP net income and EPS. We use Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EPS as key performance measures of our earnings performance. We believe that both management and investors benefit from referring to these non-GAAP financial measures in assessing our performance and when planning, forecasting and analyzing future periods. These non-GAAP financial measures also facilitate management’s internal comparison to our historical performance. In addition, management uses Adjusted EPS as a performance measure for our incentive compensation. The amounts excluded in the presentation of these non-GAAP financial measures may vary from period to period; accordingly, our presentation of Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EPS may not be indicative of future adjustments or results. For example, for the three months ended March 31, 2018, we incurred $0.5 million related to Secondary Equity Offering expenses. We included this as an adjustment in the reconciliation of Adjusted Net Income since the offering expenses are not representative of our day-to-day operations and we have included similar adjustments in prior periods; however, this adjustment did not occur and is not included in the comparative period presented within this Form 10-Q.

 

You are encouraged to evaluate each adjustment used in calculating our non-GAAP financial measures and the reasons we consider our non-GAAP financial measures appropriate for supplemental analysis. In evaluating our non-GAAP financial measures, you should be aware that in the future we may incur expenses similar to the adjustments in our presentation. Our non-GAAP financial measures have limitations as analytical tools, and you should not consider these measures in isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under GAAP. Our presentation of our non-GAAP financial measures should not be construed as an inference that our future results will be unaffected by unusual or non-recurring items. Our non-GAAP financial measures may not be comparable to other companies. Please see a historical reconciliation of these measures to the most comparable GAAP measure presented in our consolidated financial statements below in the “Results of Operations” section.

 

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Financial Presentation

 

We categorize revenue from our cruise and cruise-related activities as either “passenger ticket” revenue or “onboard and other” revenue. Passenger ticket revenue and onboard and other revenue vary according to product offering, the size of the ship in operation, the length of cruises operated and the markets in which the ship operates. Our revenue is seasonal based on demand for cruises, which has historically been strongest during the Northern Hemisphere’s summer months. Passenger ticket revenue primarily consists of revenue for accommodations, meals in certain restaurants on the ship, certain onboard entertainment, and includes revenue for service charges and air and land transportation to and from the ship to the extent guests purchase these items from us. Onboard and other revenue primarily consists of revenue from gaming, beverage sales, shore excursions, specialty dining, retail sales, spa services and photo services. Our onboard revenue is derived from onboard activities we perform directly or that are performed by independent concessionaires, from which we receive a share of their revenue.

 

Our cruise operating expense is classified as follows:

 

  · Commissions, transportation and other primarily consists of direct costs associated with passenger ticket revenue. These costs include travel agent commissions, air and land transportation expenses, related credit card fees, certain port expenses and the costs associated with shore excursions and hotel accommodations included as part of the overall cruise purchase price.

 

  · Onboard and other primarily consists of direct costs incurred in connection with onboard and other revenue, including casino, beverage sales and shore excursions.

 

  · Payroll and related consists of the cost of wages and benefits for shipboard employees and costs of certain inventory items, including food, for a third party that provides crew and other hotel services for certain ships.

 

  · Fuel includes fuel costs, the impact of certain fuel hedges and fuel delivery costs.

 

  · Food consists of food costs for passengers and crew on certain ships.

 

  · Other consists of repairs and maintenance (including Dry-dock costs), ship insurance and other ship expenses.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

For a discussion of our critical accounting policies and estimates, see “Critical Accounting Policies” included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018 under the caption “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” We have made no significant changes to our critical accounting policies and estimates from those described in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2018.

 

Quarterly Overview

 

Three months ended March 31, 2019 (“2019”) compared to three months ended March 31, 2018 (“2018”)

 

·Total revenue increased 8.5% to $1.4 billion compared to $1.3 billion.

 

·Net Revenue increased 9.0% to $1.1 billion compared to $1.0 billion.

 

·Net income and diluted EPS was $118.2 million and $0.54, respectively, compared to $103.2 million and $0.45, respectively.

 

·Operating income was $158.3 million compared to $167.1 million.

 

·Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EPS were $181.8 million and $0.83, respectively, in 2019, which included $63.6 million of adjustments primarily consisting of expenses related to non-cash compensation, losses on extinguishments of debt and modifications of debt, amortization of intangible assets and certain other adjustments. Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EPS were $137.8 million and $0.60, respectively, in 2018, which included $34.7 million of adjustments primarily consisting of expenses related to non-cash compensation, amortization of intangible assets and certain other adjustments.

 

·Adjusted EBITDA improved 10.5% to $360.6 million compared to $326.4 million.

 

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We refer you to our “Results of Operations” below for a calculation of Net Revenue, Adjusted Net Income, Adjusted EPS and Adjusted EBITDA.

 

Results of Operations

 

The following table sets forth operating data as a percentage of total revenue:

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Revenue          
Passenger ticket   69.3%   68.8%
Onboard and other   30.7%   31.2%
Total revenue   100.0%   100.0%
Cruise operating expense          
Commissions, transportation and other   16.3%   16.9%
Onboard and other   5.7%   5.5%
Payroll and related   15.9%   16.2%
Fuel   7.0%   7.2%
Food   3.9%   3.9%
Other   10.1%   9.7%
Total cruise operating expense   58.9%   59.4%
Other operating expense          
Marketing, general and administrative   17.7%   17.6%
Depreciation and amortization   12.1%   10.1%
Total other operating expense   29.8%   27.7%
Operating income   11.3%   12.9%
Non-operating income (expense)          
Interest expense, net   (5.3)%   (4.6)%
Other income (expense), net   (0.0)%   (0.1)%
Total non-operating income (expense)   (5.3)%   (4.7)%
Net income before income taxes   6.0%   8.2%
Income tax benefit (expense)   2.4%   (0.2)%
Net income   8.4%   8.0%

 

The following table sets forth selected statistical information:

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Passengers carried   645,052    617,440 
Passenger Cruise Days   4,975,440    4,724,604 
Capacity Days   4,716,929    4,466,471 
Occupancy Percentage   105.5%   105.8%

 

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Net Revenue, Gross Yield and Net Yield were calculated as follows (in thousands, except Capacity Days and Yield data):

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2019
Constant
Currency
   2018 
Passenger ticket revenue  $973,273   $984,690   $889,866 
Onboard and other revenue   430,357    430,357    403,537 
Total revenue   1,403,630    1,415,047    1,293,403 
Less:               
Commissions, transportation and other expense   229,264    231,613    218,340 
Onboard and other expense   79,413    79,413    70,688 
Net Revenue   1,094,953    1,104,021    1,004,375 
Capacity Days   4,716,929    4,716,929    4,466,471 
Gross Yield  $297.57   $299.99   $289.58 
Net Yield  $232.13   $234.06   $224.87 

 

Gross Cruise Cost, Net Cruise Cost, Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel and Adjusted Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel were calculated as follows (in thousands, except Capacity Days and per Capacity Day data):

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2019
Constant
Currency
   2018 
Total cruise operating expense  $826,651   $830,020   $768,091 
Marketing, general and administrative expense   248,942    251,070    227,015 
Gross Cruise Cost   1,075,593    1,081,090    995,106 
Less:               
Commissions, transportation and other expense   229,264    231,613    218,340 
Onboard and other expense   79,413    79,413    70,688 
Net Cruise Cost   766,916    770,064    706,078 
Less: Fuel expense   98,253    98,253    93,431 
Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel   668,663    671,811    612,647 
Less Non-GAAP Adjustments:               
Non-cash deferred compensation (1)   534    534    542 
Non-cash share-based compensation (2)   26,999    26,999    28,102 
Secondary Equity Offering expenses (3)           482 
Redeployment of Norwegian Joy (4)   5,016    5,016     
Other (5)           (992)
 Adjusted Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel  $636,114   $639,262   $584,513 
Capacity Days   4,716,929    4,716,929    4,466,471 
Gross Cruise Cost per Capacity Day  $228.03   $229.19   $222.79 
Net Cruise Cost per Capacity Day  $162.59   $163.26   $158.08 
Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel per Capacity Day  $141.76   $142.43   $137.17 
Adjusted Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel per Capacity Day  $134.86   $135.53   $130.87 

 

 

(1)Non-cash deferred compensation expenses related to the crew pension plan and other crew expenses, which are included in payroll and related expense.

(2)Non-cash share-based compensation expenses related to equity awards, which are included in marketing, general and administrative expense and payroll and related expense.

(3)Expenses related to a Secondary Equity Offering, which are included in marketing, general and administrative expense.

(4)Expenses related to the redeployment of Norwegian Joy from Asia to the U.S. and the closing of the Shanghai office, which are included in other cruise operating expense and marketing, general and administrative expense.

 

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(5)Primarily related to reimbursements of certain legal costs, which are included in marketing, general and administrative expense.

 

Adjusted Net Income and Adjusted EPS were calculated as follows (in thousands, except share and per share data):

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Net income  $118,157   $103,155 
Non-GAAP Adjustments:          
Non-cash deferred compensation (1)   879    863 
Non-cash share-based compensation (2)   26,999    28,102 
Secondary Equity Offering expenses (3)       482 
Extinguishment and modification of debt (4)   6,093     
Amortization of intangible assets (5)   4,603    6,222 
Redeployment of Norwegian Joy (6)   25,028     
Other (7)       (992)
Adjusted Net Income  $181,759   $137,832 
Diluted weighted-average shares outstanding – Net income and Adjusted Net Income   218,873,272    229,187,628 
Diluted earnings per share  $0.54   $0.45 
Adjusted EPS  $0.83   $0.60 

 

 

(1)Non-cash deferred compensation expenses related to the crew pension plan and other crew expenses, which are included in payroll and related expense and other income (expense).

(2)Non-cash share-based compensation expenses related to equity awards, which are included in marketing, general and administrative expense and payroll and related expense.

(3)Expenses related to a Secondary Equity Offering, which are included in marketing, general and administrative expense.

(4)Losses on extinguishment of debt and modification of debt are included in interest expense, net.

(5)Amortization of intangible assets related to the Acquisition of Prestige, which are included in depreciation and amortization expense.

(6) Expenses related to the redeployment of Norwegian Joy from Asia to the U.S. and the closing of the Shanghai office, which are included in other cruise operating expense, marketing, general and administrative expense and depreciation and amortization expense.
(7) Primarily related to reimbursements of certain legal costs, which are included in marketing, general and administrative expense.

 

EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA were calculated as follows (in thousands):

 

   Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
   2019   2018 
Net income  $118,157   $103,155 
Interest expense, net   73,503    59,698 
Income tax (benefit) expense   (33,798)   2,534 
Depreciation and amortization expense   169,741    131,244 
EBITDA   327,603    296,631 
Other (income) expense, net (1)   434    1,666 
Non-GAAP Adjustments:          
Non-cash deferred compensation (2)   534    542 
Non-cash share-based compensation (3)   26,999    28,102 
Secondary Equity Offering expenses (4)       482 
Redeployment of Norwegian Joy (5)   5,016     
Other (6)       (992)
Adjusted EBITDA  $360,586   $326,431 

 

 

(1)Primarily consists of gains and losses, net for foreign currency exchanges.

 

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(2)Non-cash deferred compensation expenses related to the crew pension plan and other crew expenses, which are included in payroll and related expense.
(3)Non-cash share-based compensation expenses related to equity awards, which are included in marketing, general and administrative expense and payroll and related expense.
(4)Expenses related to a Secondary Equity Offering, which are included in marketing, general and administrative expense.
(5)Expenses related to the redeployment of Norwegian Joy from Asia to the U.S. and the closing of the Shanghai office, which are included in other cruise operating expense and marketing, general and administrative expense.
(6)Primarily related to reimbursements of certain legal costs, which are included in marketing, general and administrative expense.

 

Three months ended March 31, 2019 (“2019”) compared to three months ended March 31, 2018 (“2018”)

 

Revenue

 

Total revenue increased 8.5% to $1.4 billion in 2019 compared to $1.3 billion in 2018. Gross Yield increased 2.8%. Net Revenue increased 9.0% to $1.1 billion in 2019 from $1.0 billion in 2018 due to an increase in Capacity Days of 5.6% and an increase in Net Yield of 3.2%. The increase in Capacity Days was primarily due to Norwegian Bliss joining our fleet in the second quarter of 2018. The increase in Gross Yield and Net Yield was primarily due to an increase in passenger ticket pricing. On a Constant Currency basis, Net Yield increased 4.1%.

 

Expense

 

Total cruise operating expense increased 7.6% in 2019 compared to 2018 primarily due to the increase in Capacity Days as discussed above. Gross Cruise Cost increased 8.1% in 2019 compared to 2018 due to an increase in total cruise operating expense and marketing, general and administrative expenses. Total other operating expense increased 16.9% in 2019 compared to 2018 primarily due to expenses related to the redeployment of Norwegian Joy and an increase in advertising and promotions. Depreciation and amortization expenses increased primarily due to the addition of Norwegian Bliss, renovation of Norwegian Joy and ship improvement projects. On a Capacity Day basis, Net Cruise Cost increased 2.9% (3.3% on a Constant Currency basis) primarily due to an increase in marketing, general and administrative expenses. Adjusted Net Cruise Cost Excluding Fuel per Capacity Day increased 3.0% (3.6% on a Constant Currency basis).

 

Interest expense, net was $73.5 million in 2019 compared to $59.7 million in 2018. The increase in interest expense reflects additional debt in connection with the delivery of Norwegian Bliss in 2018, Project Leonardo financing, as well as higher interest rates due to an increase in LIBOR. Also included in 2019 were losses on extinguishment of debt and debt modification costs of $6.1 million.

 

Other income (expense), net was an expense of $0.4 million in 2019 compared to an expense of $1.7 million in 2018. In 2019 and 2018, the expense was primarily related to losses on foreign currency exchange.

 

In 2019, we had an income tax benefit of $33.8 million compared to an income tax expense of $2.5 million in 2018. During 2018, we implemented certain tax restructuring strategies that created our ability to utilize the net operating loss carryforwards of Prestige, for which we had previously provided a full valuation allowance. As a result, we recorded a tax benefit of $35.7 million in connection with the reversal of substantially all of the valuation allowance.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

General

 

As of March 31, 2019, our liquidity was $1.2 billion consisting of $304.7 million in cash and cash equivalents and $875.0 million available under our Revolving Loan Facility. Our primary ongoing liquidity requirements are to finance working capital, capital expenditures and debt service.

 

As of March 31, 2019, we had a working capital deficit of $2.7 billion. This deficit included $2.0 billion of advance ticket sales, which represents the total revenue we collect in advance of sailing dates and accordingly is substantially more like deferred revenue balances rather than actual current cash liabilities. Our business model, along with our Revolving Loan Facility, allows us to operate with a working capital deficit and still meet our operating, investing and financing needs.

 

We evaluate potential sources of additional liquidity, including the capital markets, in the ordinary course of business. We will continue to evaluate opportunities to optimize our capital structure, taking into consideration our current and expected capital requirements, our assessment of prevailing market conditions and expectations regarding future conditions, and the contractual and other restrictions to which we are subject. 

 

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Sources and Uses of Cash

 

In this section, references to “2019” refer to the three months ended March 31, 2019 and references to “2018” refer to the three months ended March 31, 2018.

 

Net cash provided by operating activities was $535.4 million in 2019 as compared to $610.8 million in 2018. The net cash provided by operating activities included timing differences in cash receipts and payments relating to operating assets and liabilities. Advance ticket sales increased by $439.4 million in 2019 compared to $375.6 million in 2018. Deferred tax assets/liabilities decreased by $32.1 million in 2019 compared to an increase of $0.8 million in 2018 primarily due to the reversal of valuation allowances.

 

Net cash used in investing activities was $221.9 million in 2019 and $143.6 million in 2018, primarily related to payments for ships under construction and ship improvement projects.

 

Net cash used in financing activities was $172.6 million in 2019 primarily due to the repurchase of $200.0 million of NCLH’s ordinary shares, net repayments of our Revolving Loan Facility and the net refinancing of term loans offset by the issuance of new debt. Net cash used in financing activities was $341.6 million in 2018 primarily due to net repayments of our Revolving Loan Facility and other loan facilities. Additionally, in 2018, we repurchased $263.5 million of our ordinary shares and incurred deferred financing fees related to financing of newbuild ships.

 

Future Capital Commitments

 

Future capital commitments consist of contracted commitments, including ship construction contracts, and future expected capital expenditures necessary for operations as well as our ship refurbishment projects. As of March 31, 2019, our anticipated capital expenditures were $1.4 billion for the remainder of 2019 and $1.2 billion and $0.7 billion for the years ending December 31, 2020 and 2021, respectively. We have export credit financing in place for the anticipated expenditures related to ship construction contracts of $0.6 billion for the remainder of 2019 and $0.5 billion for 2020 and $0.2 billion for 2021. These future expected capital expenditures will significantly increase our depreciation and amortization expense as we take delivery of the ships.

 

Project Leonardo will introduce an additional six ships, each approximately 140,000 Gross Tons with approximately 3,300 Berths, with expected delivery dates from 2022 through 2027, subject to certain conditions. We have a Breakaway Plus Class Ship, Norwegian Encore, with approximately 168,000 Gross Tons with 4,000 Berths, on order for delivery in the fall of 2019. For the Regent brand, we have orders for two Explorer Class Ships, Seven Seas Splendor and an additional ship, to be delivered in 2020 and 2023, respectively. Each of the Explorer Class Ships will be approximately 55,000 Gross Tons and 750 Berths. For the Oceania Cruises brand, we have orders for two Allura Class Ships to be delivered in 2022 and 2025. Each of the Allura Class Ships will be approximately 67,000 Gross Tons and 1,200 Berths.

 

The combined contract prices of the 11 ships on order for delivery was approximately €7.9 billion, or $8.9 billion based on the euro/U.S. dollar exchange rate as of March 31, 2019. We have obtained export credit financing which is expected to fund approximately 80% of the contract price of each ship, subject to certain conditions. We do not anticipate any contractual breaches or cancellations to occur. However, if any such events were to occur, it could result in, among other things, the forfeiture of prior deposits or payments made by us and potential claims and impairment losses which may materially impact our business, financial condition and results of operations. 

 

Capitalized interest for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018 was $7.8 million and $10.1 million, respectively, primarily associated with the construction of our newbuild ships. 

 

Off-Balance Sheet Transactions

 

None.

 

Contractual Obligations

 

As of March 31, 2019 our contractual obligations with initial or remaining terms in excess of one year, including interest payments on long-term debt obligations, included the following (in thousands): 

 

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   Total   Less than
1 year
   1-3 years   3-5 years   More than
5 years
 
Long-term debt (1)  $6,655,616   $608,307   $2,017,505   $2,293,993   $1,735,811 
Operating leases (2)   287,961    31,638    63,329    62,137    130,857 
Ship construction contracts (3)   5,088,646   1,221,722    309,601    2,001,570    1,555,753 
Port facilities (4)   1,572,383    45,079    114,891    120,439    1,291,974 
Interest (5)   1,056,941    219,865    406,426    252,585    178,065 
Other (6)   1,320,957    248,428    419,588    350,783    302,158 
Total (7)  $15,982,504   $2,375,039   $3,331,340   $5,081,507   $5,194,618 

 

(1)Long-term debt includes premiums aggregating $0.3 million and finance leases. Long-term debt excludes deferred financing fees which are a direct deduction from the carrying value of the related debt liability in the consolidated balance sheets.
(2)Operating leases are primarily for offices, motor vehicles and office equipment.
(3)Ship construction contracts are for our newbuild ships based on the euro/U.S. dollar exchange rate as of March 31, 2019. Export credit financing is in place from syndicates of banks. The amount does not include the two Project Leonardo ships, one Explorer Class Ship and two Allura Class Ships which were still subject to certain Italian government approvals as of March 31, 2019.
(4)Port facilities represent our usage of certain port facilities.
(5)Interest includes fixed and variable rates with LIBOR held constant as of March 31, 2019.
(6)Other includes future commitments for service, maintenance and other business enhancement capital expenditures contracts.
(7)$0.5 million of unrecognized tax benefits were excluded from the “Total” contractual obligations as of March 31, 2019 because an estimate of the timing of future tax settlements cannot be reasonably determined.

 

Other

 

Certain service providers may require collateral in the normal course of our business. The amount of collateral may change based on certain terms and conditions.

 

As a routine part of our business, depending on market conditions, exchange rates, pricing and our strategy for growth, we regularly consider opportunities to enter into contracts for the building of additional ships. We may also consider the sale of ships, potential acquisitions and strategic alliances. If any of these were to occur, they may be financed through the incurrence of additional permitted indebtedness, through cash flows from operations, or through the issuance of debt, equity or equity-related securities.

 

Funding Sources

 

Certain of our debt agreements contain covenants that, among other things, require us to maintain a minimum level of liquidity, as well as limit our net funded debt-to-capital ratio, and maintain certain other ratios and restrict our ability to pay dividends. Substantially all of our ships and other property and equipment are pledged as collateral for certain of our debt. We believe we were in compliance with these covenants as of March 31, 2019.

 

In addition, our existing debt agreements restrict, and any of our future debt arrangements may restrict, among other things, the ability of our subsidiaries, including NCLC, to make distributions and/or pay dividends to NCLH and NCLH’s ability to pay cash dividends to its shareholders. NCLH is a holding company and depends upon its subsidiaries for their ability to pay distributions to it to finance any dividend or pay any other obligations of NCLH. However, we do not believe that these restrictions have had or are expected to have an impact on our ability to meet any cash obligations.

 

The impact of changes in world economies and especially the global credit markets can create a challenging environment and may reduce future consumer demand for cruises and adversely affect our counterparty credit risks. In the event this environment deteriorates, our business, financial condition and results of operations could be adversely impacted.

 

We believe our cash on hand, expected future operating cash inflows, additional available borrowings under our Revolving Loan Facility and our ability to issue debt securities or additional equity securities, will be sufficient to fund operations, debt payment requirements, capital expenditures and maintain compliance with covenants under our debt agreements over the next 12-month period. There is no assurance that cash flows from operations and additional financings will be available in the future to fund our future obligations.

 

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Item 3. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

General

 

We are exposed to market risk attributable to changes in interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates and fuel prices. We attempt to minimize these risks through a combination of our normal operating and financing activities and through the use of derivatives. The financial impacts of these derivative instruments are primarily offset by corresponding changes in the underlying exposures being hedged. We achieve this by closely matching the notional, term and conditions of the derivatives with the underlying risk being hedged. We do not hold or issue derivatives for trading or other speculative purposes. Derivative positions are monitored using techniques including market valuations and sensitivity analyses.

 

Interest Rate Risk

 

As of March 31, 2019, we had interest rate swap agreements to hedge our exposure to interest rate movements and to manage our interest expense. As of March 31, 2019, 75% of our debt was fixed and 25% was variable, which includes the effects of the interest rate swaps. The notional amount of outstanding debt associated with the interest rate swap agreements as of March 31, 2019 was $1.2 billion. As of December 31, 2018, 72% of our debt was fixed and 28% was variable, which includes the effects of the interest rate swaps. The notional amount of our outstanding debt associated with the interest rate swap agreements was $1.0 billion as of December 31, 2018. The change from December 31, 2018 to March 31, 2019 was due to an additional interest rate swap executed and the repayment of variable rate debt. Based on our March 31, 2019 outstanding variable rate debt balance, a one percentage point increase in annual LIBOR interest rates would increase our annual interest expense by approximately $16.9 million excluding the effects of capitalization of interest.

 

Foreign Currency Exchange Rate Risk

 

As of March 31, 2019, we had foreign currency derivatives to hedge the exposure to volatility in foreign currency exchange rates related to our ship construction contracts denominated in euros. These derivatives hedge the foreign currency exchange rate risk on a portion of the payments on our ship construction contracts. The payments not hedged aggregate €1.9 billion, or $2.1 billion based on the euro/U.S. dollar exchange rate as of March 31, 2019. As of December 31, 2018, the payments not hedged aggregated €2.2 billion, or $2.5 billion, based on the euro/U.S. dollar exchange rate as of December 31, 2018. The change from December 31, 2018 to March 31, 2019 was due to additional foreign exchange derivatives executed. We estimate that a 10% change in the euro as of March 31, 2019 would result in a $0.2 billion change in the U.S. dollar value of the foreign currency denominated remaining payments.

 

Fuel Price Risk

 

Our exposure to market risk for changes in fuel prices relates to the forecasted purchases of fuel on our ships. Fuel expense, as a percentage of our total cruise operating expense, was 11.9% and 12.2% for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018, respectively. We use fuel derivative agreements to mitigate the financial impact of fluctuations in fuel prices and as of March 31, 2019, we had hedged approximately 70%, 54% and 36% of our remaining 2019, 2020 and 2021 projected metric tons of fuel purchases, respectively. As of December 31, 2018, we had hedged approximately 57%, 53% and 33% of our 2019, 2020 and 2021 projected metric tons of fuel purchases, respectively. The change in fuel price risk from December 31, 2018 to March 31, 2019 was due to additional fuel hedges executed.

 

We estimate that a 10% increase in our weighted-average fuel price would increase our anticipated 2019 fuel expense by $34.2 million. This increase would be partially offset by an increase in the fair value of our fuel swap agreements of $20.2 million. Fair value of our derivative contracts is derived using valuation models that utilize the income valuation approach. These valuation models take into account the contract terms such as maturity, as well as other inputs such as fuel types, fuel curves, creditworthiness of the counterparty and the Company, as well as other data points. 

 

Item 4. Controls and Procedures

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our management has evaluated, with the participation of our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures, as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, as of March 31, 2019. There are inherent limitations to the effectiveness of any system of disclosure controls and procedures, including the possibility of human error and the circumvention or overriding of the controls and procedures. Accordingly, even effective disclosure controls and procedures can only provide reasonable assurance of achieving their control objectives. Based upon management’s evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of March 31, 2019 to provide reasonable assurance that the information required to be disclosed by us in the reports we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the rules and forms of the SEC, and that it is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

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Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the quarter ended March 31, 2019 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

Limitations on the Effectiveness of Controls

 

It should be noted that any system of controls, however well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, and not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the system will be met. In addition, the design of any control system is based in part upon certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events. Because of these and other inherent limitations of control systems, there is only the reasonable assurance that our controls will succeed in achieving their goals under all potential future conditions.

 

PART II. OTHER INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Legal Proceedings

 

On September 21, 2018, a purported class-action lawsuit was filed by Marta and Jerry Phillips and others against NCL Corporation Ltd. in the United States District Court for the Southern District of Florida relating to the marketing and sales of our Booksafe Travel Protection Plan. The plaintiffs purport to represent an alleged class of passengers who purchased Booksafe Travel Protection Plans. The complaint alleges that the Company concealed that it received proceeds on the sale of the travel insurance portion of the plan. The complaint seeks an unspecified amount of damages, fees and costs. We believe we have meritorious defenses to the claim and that any liability which may arise as a result of this action will not have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In the normal course of our business, various claims and lawsuits have been filed or are pending against us. Most of these claims and lawsuits are covered by insurance and, accordingly, the maximum amount of our liability is typically limited to our deductible amount.

 

Nonetheless, the ultimate outcome of these claims and lawsuits that are not covered by insurance cannot be determined at this time. We have evaluated our overall exposure with respect to all of our threatened and pending litigation and, to the extent required, we have accrued amounts for all estimable probable losses associated with our deemed exposure. We are currently unable to estimate any other potential contingent losses beyond those accrued, as discovery is not complete nor is adequate information available to estimate such range of loss or potential recovery. However, based on our current knowledge, we do not believe that the aggregate amount or range of reasonably possible losses with respect to these matters will be material to our consolidated results of operations, financial condition or cash flows. We intend to vigorously defend our legal position on all claims and, to the extent necessary, seek recovery.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

We refer you to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for a discussion of the risk factors that affect our business and financial results. We wish to caution the reader that the risk factors discussed in “Item 1A. Risk Factors” in our Annual Report on Form 10-K, elsewhere in this report or other SEC filings, could cause future results to differ materially from those stated in any forward-looking statements.

 

Other than the risk factors set forth below, there have been no material changes in our risk factors from those disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Unavailability of ports of call may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

We believe that attractive port destinations are a major reason why guests choose to go on a particular cruise or on a cruise vacation. The availability of ports, including the specific port facility at which our guests will embark and disembark, is affected by a number of factors, including, but not limited to, existing capacity constraints, security, safety and environmental concerns, adverse weather conditions and natural disasters such as hurricanes, floods, typhoons and earthquakes, financial limitations on port development, political instability, exclusivity arrangements that ports may have with our competitors, local governmental regulations and fees, local community concerns about port development and other adverse impacts on their communities from additional tourists and sanctions programs implemented by the Office of Foreign Assets Control of the United States Treasury Department or other regulatory bodies. For example, we had to temporarily change certain itineraries in the Caribbean due to damage some ports sustained during an active hurricane season in 2017. There can be no assurance that our ports of call will not be similarly affected in the future.

 

We garner a pricing premium from our itineraries to Cuba as opposed to other Caribbean itineraries. In April 2019, the U.S. Government stated that it will be tightening restrictions on travel to Cuba. If there is a change in regulations that affect travel to Cuba, it is possible that we will no longer be able to sail to Cuba. Any limitations on the availability of ports of call, including Cuba, or on the availability of shore excursions and other service providers at such ports could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Litigation, enforcement actions, fines or penalties could adversely impact our financial condition or results of operations and damage our reputation.

 

Our business is subject to various U.S. and international laws and regulations that could lead to enforcement actions, fines, civil or criminal penalties or the assertion of litigation claims and damages. In addition, improper conduct by our employees or agents could damage our reputation and/or lead to litigation or legal proceedings that could result in civil or criminal penalties, including substantial monetary fines. In certain circumstances, it may not be economical to defend against such matters, and a legal strategy may not ultimately result in us prevailing in a matter. Such events could lead to an adverse impact on our financial condition or results of operations.

 

As a result of any ship-related or other incidents, litigation claims, enforcement actions and regulatory actions and investigations, including, but not limited to, those arising from personal injury, loss of life, loss of or damage to personal property, business interruption losses or environmental damage to any affected coastal waters and the surrounding area, may be asserted or brought against various parties, including us and/or our cruise brands. The time and attention of our management may also be diverted in defending such claims, actions and investigations. Subject to applicable insurance coverage, we may also incur costs both in defending against any claims, actions and investigations and for any judgments, fines, civil or criminal penalties if such claims, actions or investigations are adversely determined.

 

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The U.S. Government announced that, effective May 2, 2019, it will no longer suspend the right of private parties to bring litigation under Title III of the Cuban Liberty and Solidarity (Libertad) Act of 1996, popularly known as the Helms-Burton Act, allowing certain individuals whose property was confiscated by the Cuban government beginning in 1959 to sue anyone who "traffics" in the property in question in U.S. courts. Monetary and other claims may now be brought against us and other companies doing business in Cuba. If these suits are successful, they could result in substantial monetary damages against the Company and/or impact the Company’s future scheduled Cuba cruise itineraries.

 

Future changes in applicable tax laws, or our inability to take advantage of favorable tax regimes, could increase the amount of taxes we must pay.

 

We believe and have taken the position that our income that is considered to be derived from the international operation of ships as well as certain income that is considered to be incidental to such income (“shipping income”), is exempt from U.S. federal income taxes under Section 883, based upon certain assumptions as to shareholdings and other information as more fully described in “Item 1—Business—Taxation.” The provisions of Section 883 are subject to change at any time, possibly with retroactive effect.

 

We believe and have taken the position that substantially all of our income derived from the international operation of ships is properly categorized as shipping income and that we do not have a material amount of non-qualifying income. It is possible, however, that a much larger percentage of our income does not qualify (or will not qualify) as shipping income. Moreover, the exemption for shipping income is only available for years in which NCLH will satisfy complex stock ownership tests or the publicly traded test under Section 883 as described in “Item 1—Business— Taxation—Exemption of International Shipping Income under Section 883 of the Code.” There are factual circumstances beyond our control, including changes in the direct and indirect owners of NCLH’s ordinary shares, which could cause us or our subsidiaries to lose the benefit of this tax exemption. Finally, any changes in our operations could significantly increase our exposure to either the Net Tax Regime or the 4% Regime (each as defined in “Item 1—Business—Taxation”), and we can give no assurances on this matter.

 

If we or any of our subsidiaries were not to qualify for the exemption under Section 883, our or such subsidiary’s U.S.-source income would be subject to either the Net Tax Regime or the 4% Regime (each as defined in “Item 1— Business— Taxation). As of the date of this filing, we believe that NCLH and its subsidiaries will satisfy the publicly traded test imposed under Section 883 and therefore believe that NCLH will qualify for the exemption under Section 883. However, as discussed above, there are factual circumstances beyond our control that could cause NCLH to not meet the stock ownership or publicly traded tests. Therefore, we can give no assurances on this matter. We refer you to “Item 1—Business—Taxation.”

 

We may be subject to state, local and non-U.S. income or non-income taxes in various jurisdictions, including those in which we transact business, own property or reside. We may be required to file tax returns in some or all of those jurisdictions. Our state, local or non-U.S. tax treatment may not conform to the U.S. federal income tax treatment discussed above. We may be required to pay non-U.S. taxes on dispositions of foreign property or operations involving foreign property that may give rise to non-U.S. income or other tax liabilities in amounts that could be substantial.

 

The various tax regimes to which we are currently subject result in a relatively low effective tax rate on our worldwide income. These tax regimes, however, are subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect. For example, legislation has been proposed in the past that would eliminate the benefits of the exemption from U.S. federal income tax under Section 883 and subject all or a portion of our shipping income to taxation in the U.S. Moreover, we may become subject to new tax regimes and may be unable to take advantage of favorable tax provisions afforded by current or future law, including exemption of branch profits and dividend withholding taxes under the U.S. – U.K. Income Tax Treaty on income derived in respect of our U.S.–flagged operation.

 

The government of Bermuda recently enacted the Economic Substance Act 2018 which sets forth minimum economic substance requirements for entities established in Bermuda. The Company is currently analyzing these rules in anticipation of further guidance from Bermuda authorities on the application of the Economic Substance Act 2018. If the Company is unable to comply with such requirements, the Company may consider alternate jurisdictions or otherwise become subject to tax regimes which may be less favorable.

 

Item 2. Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

 

Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer

 

On April 17, 2018, NCLH’s Board of Directors approved a three-year share repurchase program (the “Repurchase Program”) authorizing NCLH to purchase up to $1.0 billion of NCLH’s ordinary shares. Pursuant to the Repurchase Program, NCLH may repurchase its ordinary shares from time to time, in amounts, at prices and at such times as it deems appropriate, subject to market conditions and other considerations. Under the Repurchase Program, shares may be repurchased in open market transactions or privately negotiated transactions, including structured and derivative transactions such as accelerated share repurchase transactions, and may be made under a plan complying with Rule 10b5-1 under the Securities Exchange Act.

 

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Share repurchase activity during the three months ended March 31, 2019 was as follows (in thousands):

 

Period  Total Number
of Shares
Purchased as
Part of a
Publicly
Announced
Program
   Average
Price Paid
per Share
   Approximate
Dollar Value of
Shares that May
Yet be
Purchased
Under the
Program
(in thousands)
 
January 1, 2019 – January 31, 2019      $   $598,694 
February 1, 2019 – February 28, 2019      $   $598,694 
March 1, 2019 – March 31, 2019   3,624   $55.18   $398,699 
Total for the three months ended March 31, 2019   3,624   $55.18   $398,699 

 

Item 5. Other Information

 

None.

 

Item 6. Exhibits

 

31.1*   Certification of the President and Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
     
31.2*   Certification of the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
     
32.1**   Certifications of the President and Chief Executive Officer and the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Section 1350 of Chapter 63 of Title 18 of the United States Code
     
101*   The following unaudited consolidated financial statements are from Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended March 31, 2019, formatted in Extensible Business Reporting Language (XBRL), as follows:

 

  (i) the Consolidated Statements of Operations for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018;
     
  (ii) the Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the three ended March 31, 2019 and 2018;
     
  (iii) the Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018;
     
  (iv) the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018;
     
  (v) the Consolidated Statements of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity for the three months ended March 31, 2019 and 2018; and
     
  (vi) the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, tagged in summary and detail.
     
  * Filed herewith.
     
  ** Furnished herewith.

 

 34 

 

  

SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

  NORWEGIAN CRUISE LINE HOLDINGS LTD.
  (Registrant)
     
  By: /s/ FRANK J. DEL RIO
  Name:  Frank J. Del Rio
  Title: President and Chief Executive Officer
    (Principal Executive Officer)
     
  By: /s/ MARK A. KEMPA 
  Name: Mark A. Kempa
  Title: Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
    (Principal Financial Officer)

 

Dated: May 10, 2019

 

 35 

.

Exhibit 31.1

CERTIFICATION

 

I, Frank J. Del Rio, certify that:

 

1.I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.;

 

2.Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

 

3.Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

 

4.The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

a. Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

b. Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

c. Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation;

 

d. Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5.The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

a. All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

b. Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Dated: May 10, 2019      
  /s/ Frank J. Del Rio  
  Name: Frank J. Del Rio  
  Title: President and Chief Executive Officer  

  

 

 

Exhibit 31.2

CERTIFICATION

 

I, Mark A. Kempa, certify that:

 

1.I have reviewed this quarterly report on Form 10-Q of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd.;

 

2.Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

 

3.Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

 

4.The registrant’s other certifying officer and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f)) for the registrant and have:

 

a. Designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

b. Designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

c. Evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation;

 

d. Disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

 

5.The registrant’s other certifying officer and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

a. All significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

b. Any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

 

Dated: May 10, 2019      
  /s/ Mark A. Kempa  
  Name: Mark A. Kempa  
  Title: Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer  

 

 

 

Exhibit 32.1

 

CERTIFICATIONS OF CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER AND CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350 AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

 

Pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, each of Frank J. Del Rio, the President and Chief Executive Officer, and Mark A. Kempa, the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings Ltd. (the "Company"), does hereby certify, that, to such officer’s knowledge:

 

The Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q of the Company, for the quarter ended March 31, 2019 (the “Form 10-Q”), fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and information contained in the Form 10-Q fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of the Company.

 

Dated: May 10, 2019      
  By: /s/ Frank J. Del Rio  
  Name: Frank J. Del Rio  
  Title: President and Chief Executive Officer  
       
  By: /s/ Mark A. Kempa  
  Name: Mark A. Kempa  
  Title: Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer